I have extensive experience teaching literature, writing, and interdisciplinary research, and I specialize in first-year instruction.

I am currently a Lecturer at the University of British Columbia, where I teach in the Arts Studies in Research and Writing program and in the Coordinated Arts Program. I have previously taught at Brown University and at Muhlenberg College.

Current Courses: 
University of British Columbia

WRDS 150: Is Privacy Dead? 

Today, we often hear that “privacy is dead.” Some blame growing surveillance by governments and by Silicon Valley tech companies, while others blame an increasingly confessional culture, characterized by constant “over-sharing” on social media and on reality television. But today’s post mortems for a lost privacy follow in a long tradition; lawyers, activists, and philosophers have declared the death of privacy over and over again – in the 1890s, the 1960s, the 1990s, and likely every decade in between. In this course, we will read and analyze scholarly research from across the disciplines in order to better understand what privacy is, whether we are losing it, and why it might be worth protecting.  Across the semester, you will also learn the conventions of scholarly discourse. We will consider how scholars in fields like law, history, communications, and psychology identify knowledge gaps, present arguments, and work with primary sources. Through this study, you will learn to emulate these practices in your own writing and will master a number of scholarly genres, including the literature review, research proposal, and annotated bibliography. The course will culminate in a research essay, where you will consider one aspect of contemporary surveillance or confessional culture.

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ASTU 100: Strange Futures (Coordinated Arts Program: Media Studies Stream). 

It’s safe to say that the future has never been stranger: seas are rising and political tides are shifting; AI is getting smarter and rockets to Mars are looking likelier. In this course, we will consider how the future is envisioned in contemporary media – examining essays, novels, and films. Throughout the course, we will also discuss what these images of the future tell us about our current social and political world; we will consider what our dreams and nightmares about the future tell us about our current hopes and anxieties. How do Ling Ma's Severance and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go envision the future of work, education, and meritocracy? How do Don DeLillo's White Noise and Spike Jonze's Her depict our changing relationships to technology? How do Mohsin Hamid's Exit West and Jordan Peele’s Get Out use magic, fantasy, or horror to probe the realities of racism? Through our study of these texts, you will also learn how to write in a variety of genres, both academic (summary, analytic essay, literature review, research proposal, research presentation, research essay) and non-academic (film review, book review).

Past Courses:
University of British Columbia

WRDS 150: Is Privacy Dead?  Summer 2019.

In this first-year, 3-credit course, students learn the fundamentals of academic research and writing, acting as apprentice members of the scholarly community. My section was built around the research question, "Is Privacy Dead?"
 

ASTU 100: Strange Futures (Coordinated Arts Program: Media Studies Stream). Fall 2018-Spring 2019.

In this first-year, 6-credit course, students learn the fundamentals of academic writing, literary analysis, and scholarly research. The course is part of the Coordinated Arts Program - a unique, interdisciplinary, cohort program. My section was built around the theme of "Strange Futures."
 

Muhlenberg College

Contemporary Fiction (Writing Intensive). Spring 2018.
In this 200-level, 3-credit course, students learned close-reading techniques through the study of global contemporary fiction. The course was designated as writing-intensive and extensive focus was placed on university-level essay writing.

 

Genres of Popular Fiction. Spring 2018.
In this 200-level, 3-credit course, students learned close-reading techniques through the study of crime and detective fiction.

 

Confession and Surveillance in Literature & Film. Spring 2018.
In this upper-level, 3-credit course, students analyzed a selection of post-WWII film, literature, and critical theory in order to contextualize contemporary debates about privacy. The course was cross-listed in Film Studies.

 

First Year Seminar: Reading the Supreme Court (Writing Intensive). Fall 2017.

In this 100-level, 3-credit course, students learned the fundamentals of university-level essay writing. Students wrote about the relationship between legal cases and literary texts, while also learning techniques for brainstorming, organization, argumentation, and revision.

 

Contemporary Fiction (Writing Intensive). Fall 2017.

In this 200-level, 3-credit course, students learned close-reading techniques through
 the study of global, contemporary fiction. The course was designated as writing- intensive and extensive focus was placed on university-level essay writing.

 

Literature as Politics: Democracy in America (Writing Intensive).  Fall 2017.

In this 200-level, 3-credit course, students learned close-reading techniques through the study of American political novels and political theory. The course was designated as writing-intensive and extensive focus was placed on university-level essay writing.
 

Brown University English Department

Criminal Elements: American Literature and the Detective Novel. (Writing Intensive) Spring 2014.

In this 200-level, 3-credit course, students learned close-reading techniques through the study of crime and detective fiction. The course was designated as writing-intensive and extensive focus was placed on university-level essay writing.
 

Summer at Brown Pre-college Program

Composing the Academic Essay. Summers 2016 & 2017.

This course prepared high school students for university-level writing. The class met 3 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Students learned techniques of research, planning, argumentation, and revision.

 

Putting Yourself into Words. Summers 2014 & 2015.
This course prepared high school students to write engaging and polished personal essays. The class met 3 hours a day for 5 days.